Israel and the Arab world – Jerusalem Studio 373

Israel’s relations – with what is considered to be, the moderate Arab world, had recently been upgraded from an open secret to public display, which raises questions vis-à-vis the visibility of Israel’s acceptance in the pre-dominantly Arab region.

Panel:
-Jonathan Hessen, host.
-Amir Oren, analyst.
-Mr. Danny Ayalon – Israel’s Former Deputy Foreign Minister and Ambassador to the United States.
– Dr. Nir Boms – Research fellow, Moshe Dayan center at Tel Aviv University
– Lt. Col. Res. Reuven Ben Shalom – Cross-cultural strategist and columnist at the Jerusalem Post.

Read More Leave comment

Israel-Jordan, peace treaty enters it’s 25th anniversity – A crisis in the making?

After seemingly having a relatively tranquil quarter century, following the 1994 signing of a peace treaty between Jordan and Israel, a sudden chill is threatening the relations between the two countries, with the announcement by King Abdullah to end certain arrangements of the bilateral agreement.

To discuss the expected implications of the move, we are joined here in the studio by;

Dr. Nir Boms – Research fellow, Moshe Dayan center at Tel Aviv University
Mr. Gilad Sher, Senior Research Fellow – INSS
Dr. Eran Lerman, Vice President of the Jerusalem Institute for Security and Strategy and a lecturer at Shalem College in Jerusalem

Analyst: Amir Oren

 

Read More Leave comment

Syria’s alleged use of Chemical Weapons

 

 

 

The fighting in the North-western district of Idlib may turn out to be the last big battle in the Syrian civil war. In its determination to gain a final victory, the Assad regime has been accused of readying a chemical weapon strike, and there is an American commitment to punish Damascus if that happens.

To discuss these events, we are joined by…
1. Dr. Nir Boms – Research fellow, Moshe Dayan center at Tel Aviv University
2. Prof. Zeev Hanin, Expert on Russian and Middle Eastern Studies, Bar Ilan and Ariel Universities
3. TV7 Analist Paula Slier

Read More Leave comment

The Internet Hate Paradox

 

 

 

The advent of the internet was groundbreaking, allowing half the planet—from students to scientists—access to an unparalleled amount of information and resources acquired throughout the history of time. It has become an integral part of our lives, revolutionizing trade, finance, shopping, and banking, while changing the structure of communication and furthering globalization. Today, it is estimated that over4billion people have access to the internet. There are reportedly 6,000 tweets posted every second on Twitter, totaling a whopping 500 million tweets per day. YouTube claims that 400 hours of video are added to its site per minute.  Every hour, Facebook’s roughly 2.07 billion users world wide post around 30 million messages.

The internet has given a voice to those who previously had no means of expressing themselves to a wider audience. This phenomenon was first observed in 2009, when a Moldovan student protest was organized after cell phone coverage was halted by the government. This was considered the first “Twitter revolution.”3 After the disputed 2009 Iranian presidential elections, civilians took to the streets and were able to freely post hundreds of accounts, videos, and photos of clashes that were taking place. In 2011, Egyptians were able to organize, and garner public support, via Twitter in order to bring down the government. However, despite all of these positive uses, there are inherent dangers in the flow of information. This powerful engine of communication has also become a weapon of choice for extremist groups, crime networks, and terrorists, who use it to preach hate, spread dangerous ideologies and propaganda, and incite violence.

Full article here 

Read More Leave comment